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Anti drug songs popular

Don't have an account yet? Get the most out of your experience with a personalized all-access pass to everything local on events, music, restaurants, news and more. A kabillion rap songs out there celebrate ganja and booger sugar - case in point: Young Jeezy at the Arena Theatre this weekend - but anti-drug rap songs are insanely rare. You have a better chance of finding a mastered copy of Detox. Luckily for you, Rocks Off went digging and found 10 great rap songs about drug refusal. It gets no more anti-gangsta than Biz Markie. The Clown Prince of hip-hop is best known for comical rhymes and compelling narratives, so that makes him a perfect candidate for an anti-drug PSA. Biz has a unique way of making people laugh and think at the same time, as he does on "Things Get A Little Easier. Contrary to what the title may suggest, "Gittin' High" isn't actually about smoking ganja. In fact, it's the antithesis of a weed anthem.
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The cannabis culture has always looked at April 20 as a celebration of that certain smoked weed, used at p. In certain places in the U.
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"Heroin," The Velvet Underground (1967)

FlourishAnyway believes there is a playlist for just about any situation and is on a mission to unite and entertain the world through song. Kylee is an aging beauty—long blonde hair, with a mouth like a sailor. She's sneaky smart in the street kind of way and can crack a joke clean or dirty that will have everyone in the room doubled over in stiches. The other week, Kylee headed for Wal-mart on what was supposed to be a quick grocery run. She didn't come back for four days. Actually, she's done that a couple of times. And really, should it be a surprise? Everyone knows you can't run to Wal-mart for a quick anything. But four days is a long shopping trip, especially when she has a teenage daughter waiting for her at home. Kylee's mother eventually found her at a crack house on the low side of town, consorting with dangerous people.
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Top 10 Emotional Hip Hop Songs

One version of rock history could be told by the many songs that have been written about the alluring dangers of drug use. D'Angelo personifies his love for weed a la Rick James' "Mary Jane" over a smoked-out groove that tells you the real story as clearly as lines like "my eyes are a shade blood burgundy. There are songs that treat sexual attraction like a drug addiction, and there are songs that treat drug addiction like sexual attraction, and the way D'Angelo sings, "I gets high off your love," makes it clear that this is the latter. Yes, of course marijuana isn't chemically addictive. Neither is sex, right? Actual "yellow diamonds" do exist in gem form, and can be purchased at your local jeweler, but the kind Rihanna sings about are only available from less-reputable sources. In case the slang is too subtle for you, the pills and dilated pupils of the video imagery hammers that interpretation home. It's more than druggy enough to make you wonder what RiRi is singing about on "Diamonds. With hip-hop and pop stars obsessing over new-fangled chemical experiences like MDMA and prescription cough syrup, it was refreshing to have a good old-fashioned song about being blasted out of your mind on cocaine topping the charts last year. Not that Abel Tesfaye explicitly mentions what drug has numbed his skull.
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FlourishAnyway believes there is a playlist for just about any situation and is on a mission to unite and entertain the world through song. Kylee is an aging beauty—long blonde hair, with a mouth like a sailor. She's sneaky smart in the street kind of way and can crack a joke clean or dirty that will have everyone in the room doubled over in stiches. The other week, Kylee headed for Wal-mart on what was supposed to be a quick grocery run. She didn't come back for four days. Actually, she's done that a couple of times. And really, should it be a surprise?

Everyone knows you can't run to Wal-mart for a quick anything. But four days is a long shopping trip, especially when she has a teenage daughter waiting for her at home. Kylee's mother eventually found her at a crack house on the low side of town, consorting with dangerous people. Because of her drug habit, the regional jail has been Kylee's occasional address.

She's stolen prescription drugs from a chronically ill relative. She's allegedly traded drugs for sex. She's beaten up her own drug dealer and stolen his car never a smart move. An addict, she has quit drugs, relapsed, gone to rehab, and repeated the awful cycle of addiction. Perhaps one day she will succeed in getting clean, but for now she waits to hit bottom.

How much lower can she go? Although I've never struggled with drugs or alcohol personally, I have known substance abusers. Kylee is my cousin. If her story is familiar to you, then I hope it's because you've made it to the other side and are recovering. I wish you peace, strength, and good health in your lifelong journey. Here is a long list of songs about addiction, dependency, getting sober, and the process of recovery — because each day of being clean and sober should be cause for celebration. Make a playlist to remind yourself just how far you have come.

Or make a playlist for someone you love who is on this journey. Recovery has been a long road for the narrator in this rock song. He's finally calling an old love whom he hurt with his addiction. He apologizes and explains that it's been awhile since drugs didn't control his life.

It feels good to be clean again. And it's been awhile since I can say that I wasn't addicted And it's been awhile since I can say I love myself as well. Alcohol and drugs used to plague the guy in this song, but now he blisses out on being clean and sober. He wants other young people to know that life's too short for addiction. And I got the recipe, I don't need no Hennessey, Yeah, it's been nine months now, Haven't had a drink and I'm starting to see clear now, I'm putting all my fears down, I can hear the cheers now, Seeing peace signs when I look around.

How did you realize you had a problem? What was the impact on your life and the lives of others? What motivates you during recovery? Any advice you'd offer others? The narrator insists that her problem isn't all that bad — that she drinks because she fears a break-up with her soulmate. She insists she doesn't have the time for rehab, and there's nothing new she can learn there. The autobiographically-inspired song was written after the singer's minute stay in rehab which she attended simply so she could tell her record label that she went.

Sadly, the extraordinarily talented Winehouse died of alcohol poisoning in at the age of The man said, "Why do you think you here? This power ballad describes the desperation of a life of pain, drugs, and sin.

The narrator finally hit bottom, and when he got help, he was amazed at how his life turned around. It's amazing With the blink of an eye, I finally saw the light It's amazing That when the moment arrives, you know you'll be alright. From the inside of a prison cell, the guy in this country song is remorseful about his choices.

He had a sweet wife who doubled as a best friend, a job, and he owned property. However, he was running with the wrong crowd and traded the security of his life for "cocaine and a whore" when the police nabbed him in a local motel. From behind bars, he's gained new appreciation and perspective.

This beautiful and tragic country ballad from tells the story of a broken romance that ultimately claimed two lives. After the woman he loved rejected him, the man spent years trying to drink her off his mind until one night he died by alcohol poisoning. Brokenhearted, she then repeated his self-destructive act. He put that bottle to his head and pulled the trigger And finally drank away her memory Life is short, but this time it was bigger Than the strength he had to get up off his knees,.

After songwriter Ed Sheeran visited a homeless shelter and listened to others' life stories, he wrote this song about a heroin-addicted prostitute. The woman has been on the streets since she was Both her body and her soul have been hollowed out by the horrors of drug addiction and life on the mean streets.

The narrator in this song is on drugs and has another man's blood on his clothes. He lives a fast-paced, dangerous and unpredictable life, and issues a warning to the woman he's with: She should not fall in love with him. That always works, right? In my dark times I'll be going back to the street Promising everything I do not mean In my dark times, baby this is all I could be Don't think my mother could love me for me In my dark times, in my dark times. The narrator in this Grammy-nominated song acknowledges that she's made some big mistakes.

She got caught up in the wrong crowd and she admits she has messed up. Ironically, then those same friends rejected her, embarrased of what she had become. As she fights her way back, she seeks hope and redemption, not blame. With last night on his breath, the narrator in this country song stands up in an AA meeting and tells the group that it's not the whiskey, the cigarettes, or the the stuff he smokes that is killing him.

Instead, he claims, it's the memories of the woman who left him and the hole that is left in his heart. He's tried in vain to fill it with addictions, topped with a double heap of denial. In this song, the American Idol depicts a woman who has been sober for three months, having plucked the negative people and influences out of her life in order to focus on her well-being.

The narrator is not comparing or second guessing herself. She feels fortunate to be taking one day at a time. Clarkson herself is not alcoholic. Instead, she used alcoholism as a metaphor for the addictions each person faces. Three months and I'm still sober Picked all my weeds but kept the flowers But I know it's never really over. In this country song, a bunch of guys are sitting in a bar and they notice one of their own is enjoying a regular Coke.

They begin to tease him, asking him why he won't have a few drinks with them? What is wrong with them? But also, what's he doing in a bar? The guy explains that he cannot help himself; he doesn't stop at just one. One drink leads to 13, he explains, as well as to a lot of other unwanted behavior. The alcoholic narrator in this country song has found his bottom, so he takes his bottle of bourbon to the church and pours it out as an offering to God.

Tired of living this way, he asks for divine help to become the man he can be and to face the world without the crutch of alcohol. This hip hop song describes the morning after the party, when a woman once again wakes up alone.

She is half-clothed in a strange house, wondering what she did last night and who she upset this time. Through the shame, she's throwing up, ignoring her phone, and trying to compose herself to call in sick to work.

Told from the perspective of the son of an alcoholic, this song is a touching reminder that the children of an alcoholic are impacted tremendously by the disease. In the song, the young boy waits for his father to come home from work, but when he does, the man is drunk and passes out. Years later, when graduating from high school, the teenager sees his drunk father leave the auditorium before he even receives his diploma. The son vows never to put his own children through the trauma of what he experienced growing up as the child of an alcoholic.

This catchy rock song was written about an actual young woman named Jane who shared a house in Hollywood with a group of struggling musicians. She came from a well-to-do family, had a heroin habit and an abusive drug dealer boyfriend. As referred to in the song, she often talked about saving money to go to Europe. When she got angry, she'd take a swipe at one of her 12 or so other housemates.

When the tv or other items came up missing in the house, the roommates would blame it on "Jane's addiction," thus they named their group after her. The real Jane finally kicked her habit years later.

The narrator in this song sees drugs, booze, and toxic relationships for what they truly are: a form of slow suicide. Having previously suffered by his own hand, he realizes that life is short and precious, and he refuses to engage in self-destruction. I can't let this life pass me by In a blink of an eye it ends I can't let my tomorrows decide What I am in this life It's like committing slow suicide. There's a powerful message behind this song: You can change your self-destructive ways rather than seeking experiences like drugs that will put you in a coffin before your time.

Don't wait until it's too late to learn how to live. For all her weirdness, Lady Gaga actually has an impressive voice, and this love ballad demonstrates it.

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