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Charlie Brown nicknamed Chuck by Peppermint Patty is the principal character of the comic strip Peanuts , syndicated in daily and Sunday newspapers in numerous countries all over the world. Depicted as a " lovable loser ," Charlie Brown is one of the great American archetypes and a popular and widely recognized cartoon character.
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Most of us are much more acquainted with losing than winning. Charles M. Schulz on Charlie Brown. He has been hailed as one of the best cartoon characters of all time, and he has become one of the great American archetypes. Personality-wise, he is gentle, insecure, and lovable. Charlie Brown possesses significant determination and hope but frequently fails because of his insecurities, outside interference, or plain bad luck. While he can be smart, he over-thinks things and this often gives him a tendency to procrastinate. While all of the permanent characters and a few minor characters are his friends, he is often ostracized by them, and three of his friends even bully him, particularly Lucy van Pelt. Many of them including the bullies , however, follow him as the manager of a baseball team , and that is where Charlie Brown's greatest skill, good leadership, is displayed. He leads the baseball team and keeps hoping for a victory despite their numerous failures and painful letdowns, yelling words of admirable encouragement to his players, leading them to the next game.
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I t really was a dark and stormy night. On February 12, , Charles Schulz—who had single-handedly drawn some 18, Peanuts comic strips, who refused to use assistants to ink or letter his comics, who vowed that after he quit, no new Peanuts strips would be made—died, taking to the grave, it seemed, any further adventures of the gang. It had been going for five decades. Schulz hated and resented the name Peanuts , which was foisted on him by United Feature Syndicate. Why was this comic strip so wildly popular for half a century? Peanuts was deceptive. The characters, though funny, could stir up shockingly heated arguments over how to survive and still be a decent human being in a bitter world. Who was better at it—Charlie Brown or Snoopy? The time is ripe to see what was really happening on the pages of Peanuts during all those years. Since , the comics publisher Fantagraphics has been issuing The Complete Peanuts , both Sunday and daily strips, in books that each cover two years and include an appreciation from a notable fan.
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I t really was a dark and stormy night. On February 12, , Charles Schulz—who had single-handedly drawn some 18, Peanuts comic strips, who refused to use assistants to ink or letter his comics, who vowed that after he quit, no new Peanuts strips would be made—died, taking to the grave, it seemed, any further adventures of the gang.

It had been going for five decades. Schulz hated and resented the name Peanuts , which was foisted on him by United Feature Syndicate. Why was this comic strip so wildly popular for half a century? Peanuts was deceptive. The characters, though funny, could stir up shockingly heated arguments over how to survive and still be a decent human being in a bitter world. Who was better at it—Charlie Brown or Snoopy? The time is ripe to see what was really happening on the pages of Peanuts during all those years.

Since , the comics publisher Fantagraphics has been issuing The Complete Peanuts , both Sunday and daily strips, in books that each cover two years and include an appreciation from a notable fan. The volume series will be completed next year. I n the stone age of Peanuts —when only seven newspapers carried the strip, when Snoopy was still an itinerant four-legged creature with no owner or doghouse, when Lucy and Linus had yet to be born— Peanuts was surprisingly dark.

The first strip, published on October 2, , shows two children, a boy and a girl, sitting on the sidewalk. These bleak themes, which went against the tide of the go-go s, floated freely on the pages of Peanuts at first, landing lightly on one kid or another until slowly each theme came to be embedded in a certain individual—particularly Lucy, Schroeder, Charlie Brown, Linus, and Snoopy. Even Charlie Brown was a bit of a heel. At the center of this world was Charlie Brown, a new kind of epic hero—a loser who would lie in the dark recalling his defeats, charting his worries, planning his comebacks.

His mailbox was almost always empty. His dog often snubbed him, at least until suppertime, and the football was always yanked away from him. The cartoonist Tom Tomorrow calls him a Sisyphus. Frustration was his lot. Definitely not! I suspect we all did. And luckily, beginning in after Schulz moved from his hometown, St. Paul, Minnesota, to Colorado Springs for a year with his first wife, Joyce, and her daughter, Meredith , there were plenty more alter egos to choose from.

That was the year the Van Pelts were born. Lucy, the fussbudget, who was based at first on young Meredith, came in March. And then, of course, there was Snoopy, who had been around from the outset Schulz had intended to name him Sniffy and was fast evolving into an articulate being.

I like to think that Peanuts and identity politics grew up together in America. By , the main characters—Charlie Brown, Linus, Schroeder, Snoopy—had their roles and their acolytes. Even Lucy had her fans. The filmmaker John Waters, writing an introduction to one of the Fantagraphics volumes, gushes:. It was a big part of the appeal of Peanuts. Every character was a powerful personality with quirky attractions and profound faults, and every character, like some saint or hero, had at least one key prop or attribute. In this blessedly solid world, each character came to be linked not only to certain objects but to certain kinds of interactions, too, much like the main players in Krazy Kat , one of the strips that Schulz admired and hoped to match.

But unlike Krazy Kat , which was built upon a tragically repetitive love triangle that involved animals hurling bricks, Peanuts was a drama of social coping, outwardly simple but actually quite complex. In fact, all of the characters were survivors. They just had different strategies for survival, none of which was exactly prosocial. Linus knew that he could take his blows philosophically—he was often seen, elbows on the wall, calmly chatting with Charlie Brown—as long as he had his security blanket nearby.

In the child psychiatrist D. Five cents, please. Snoopy figured that since no one will ever see you the way you see yourself, you might as well build your world around fantasy, create the person you want to be, and live it out, live it up.

Most of the kids saw him as just a dog, but he knew he was way more than that. Those characters who could not be summed up with both a social strategy and a recognizable attribute Pig-Pen, for instance, had an attribute—dirt—but no social strategy became bit players or fell by the wayside.

Shermy, the character who uttered the bitter opening lines of Peanuts in , became just another bland boy by the s. Violet, the character who made endless mud pies, withheld countless invitations, and had the distinction of being the first person to pull the football away from Charlie Brown, was mercilessly demoted to just another snobby mean girl. Patty, one of the early stars, had her name recycled for another, more complicated character, Peppermint Patty, the narcoleptic tomboy who made her first appearance in and became a regular in the s.

Her social gambit was to fall asleep, usually at her school desk. Once the main cast was set, the iterations of their daily interplay were almost unlimited. She was so strident, Michaelis reports, that Schulz relied on certain pen nibs for her. Lucy was, in essence, society itself, or at least society as Schulz saw it. Charlie Brown, for instance, responded to her with incredible credulity, coming to her time and again for pointless advice or for football kicking.

Linus always seemed to approach her with a combination of terror and equanimity. Woman is winning!! Woman is winning!!! I n this deeply dystopic strip, there was only one character who could—and some say finally did—tear the highly entertaining, disturbed social world to shreds. And that happens to be my favorite character, Snoopy. Before Snoopy had his signature doghouse, he was an emotional creature.

In one strip, for instance, Linus and Charlie Brown are talking in the background, and Snoopy comes dancing by. But by the late s, Snoopy had begun to change. He needed only his imagination. More and more often he appeared alone on his doghouse, sleeping or typing a novel or a love letter. Snoopy, as Franzen has noted, is. But some people detested the new Snoopy and blamed him for what they viewed as the decline of Peanuts in the second half of its year run.

The problem, as Caldwell saw it, was that. Snoopy unquestionably took the strip to a new realm beginning in the late s. In this Halloween television special, Snoopy is shown sitting atop his doghouse living out his extended fantasy of being a World War I flying ace shot down by the Red Baron and then crawling alone behind enemy lines in France. He can go it alone. And after that he often did. The next year, Snoopy had a lunar module named after him for the Apollo 10 mission the command module was called Charlie Brown.

In and , Snoopy was a write-in candidate for president of the United States. Plush stuffed Snoopys became popular. I had one. By , Snoopy had replaced Charlie Brown as the center of the strip.

He cut a swath through the world. For instance, in parts of Europe Peanuts came to be licensed as Snoopy. To accommodate this new Snoopy-centric world, Schulz began making changes.

He invented a whole new animal world for Snoopy. First came Woodstock, a bird who communicates only with Snoopy in little tic marks. And then Snoopy acquired a family: Spike, a droopy-eyed, mustachioed beagle, followed by Olaf, Andy, Marbles, and Belle. He was right. There was something fundamentally rotten about the new Snoopy, whose charm was based on his total lack of concern about what others thought of him. His confidence, his breezy sense that the world may be falling apart but one can still dance on, was worse than irritating. It was morally bankrupt.

This new Snoopy, his detractors felt, had no room for empathy. Such self-flattery is not only shallow but wrong. Snoopy, viewed this way, is the very essence of selfie culture, of Facebook culture.

Just as some people thought that Charlie Brown, the insecure loser, the boy who never won the love of the Little Red-Haired Girl, was the alter ego of Schulz himself near the beginning of his career, so Snoopy could be cast as the egotistical alter ego of Schulz the world-famous millionaire, who finally found a little happiness in his second marriage and thus became insufferably cutesy.

Two-legged Snoopy, with his airs and fantasies—peerless Snoopy, rich Snoopy, popular Snoopy, world-famous Snoopy, contented Snoopy—spoiled it all. Schulz, who had a lifelong fear of being seen as ostentatious, believed that the main character of a comic strip should not be too much of a showboat. But he was smitten with Snoopy. The final comic strips, which came out when Schulz realized he was dying, are pretty heartbreaking.

All of the characters seem to be trying to say goodbye, reaching for the solidarity that has always eluded them. Indeed, by his thought balloons alone, you might mistake him for Charlie Brown. The strip dated January 15, , shows Snoopy on his doghouse. Snoopy may have been delusional, but in the end he knew very well that everything could come tumbling down.

His very existence seems to be a way of saying that no matter what a person builds up for himself inside or outside society, everyone is basically alone in it together. In the strip that ran on January 1, , drawn in shaky lines, the kids are having a great snowball fight. Skip to content. Sign in My Account Subscribe.



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